Keepin’ the Customers satisfied

As a young lad in Geelong, I sold newspapers, for the Experience. Around that time I bought a 45 single, Bridge Over Troubled Water by Simon & Garfunkel. Bit orchestrated but amazing song, although  I didn’t much care for the flip side ‘Keep the customer satisfied’. I didn’t think it all that good a song, and it didn’t seem to have much to do with customers, or not the sort of customers I was likely to come across across back then.

I like that song more now, but still don’t think it has much to do with customers, apart from the snappy title. Similarly, the great Australian song Esmerelda by the Indelible Murtceps (an anagram of their alter ego Spectrum), sang about ‘always one more customer to go’, but once again, not the sort of customers a newspaper ‘distributor’ or Statistical consultant is (hopefully) likely to meet.

Bridge Over Troubled Water sounds better though, with its message of hope and reassurance (although a some of the words are admittedly a bit dodgy). Reassurance is vital in Statistical Consulting, where clients are often scared of statistics. The other important thing, in any form of consulting, is that clients must feel they come out with something positive that they didn’t come in with (information, a new ‘clever consultant riff they can try in SPSS or whatever), as well as feeling a bit more relaxed.

Whether it be cafe’s or consulting , offering a glass of water or cup of tea or coffee, keeping up an interesting patter about the daily specials, or how it is that median quartile regression may help to make length of stay data clearer, you always got to

Keep the Customer Satisfied!

Author: Dr Dean McKenzie

I hold a BA(Honours) in Psychology from Deakin University, and much more recently, a PhD in Psychiatric Epidemiology (Classification & Regression Trees) from Monash University (2009) I have many years experience applying classical (e.g. ANOVA), contemporary (e.g. quantile regression) and data mining (e.g. trees, bagging, boosting, random forests) to psychological, medical and health data using Stata, IBM SPSS, Salford CART and open source Weka, as well as in statistical consulting, and advising people of many different levels of stats experience